Sample Items

  • 1856-05, Unnamed enslaved girl, Health (Medical Treatment)

    An unnamed enslaved girl of approximately 10-11 years of age, was severely beaten by University of Virginia student and lodger at Lucy Terrell's boarding house, N.B. Noland. Her injuries were so severe as to require attendance by an unnamed physician. Partial transcript: "whilst the family was at dinner, he went to the back door of Miss Terrell's residence & called the girl, who went to the door, and being seised by him was knocked down & kicked & beaten so severely as to be for a time insensible, and to require the attendance of a Physician afterwards
  • 1856-05, Unnamed enslaved girl, Violence (Physical Assault)

    An unnamed enslaved girl of approximately 10-11 years of age, while staying at the boardinghouse of hotel keeper Lucy Terrell, was severely beaten by University of Virginia student and lodger at Terrell's boarding house, Noble Beveridge Noland. At the May 2, 1856 faculty meeting Noland states that this was in response to impertinence and, while he regrets the severity of the punishment, he cannot promise he wouldn't do something similar again. The faculty rules that he withdraw from the University. The next day he sends a longer letter of apology to the faculty and they reverse that decision and let him off with nothing more than a reprimand.
  • 1839-02-24, Fielding, Resistance

    Fielding, an enslaved man owned by University of Virginia professor Charles Bonnycastle, intervened when two University of Virginia students, Franklin English and Madison McAfee, attempted to disperse a group of free Black people, including two people who were having a fight. Fielding attempted to prevent them from doing so, using both a stick and a stone. English and McAfee, along with several other University of Virginia students, beat Fielding severely (see related event). Fielding continued resisting and fighting back, as the crowd chased him to several different locations. The University of Virginia faculty committee took no action against the students involved.
  • 1839-02-24, Fielding, Violence (Physical Assault)

    Fielding, an enslaved man owned by University of Virginia professor Charles Bonnycastle, was severely beaten by several University of Virginia students, including Franklin English, Madison McAfee, Calvin Jones, Benjamin Johnson, and John H. Harrison. According to the testimonies of several witnesses, all of whom were white, English and McAffee were attempting to disperse a group of free Black people, including two people who were having a fight, and Fielding attempted to prevent them from doing so, using both a stick and a stone (see related event). In retaliation they beat him severely, chasing him to several different locations until Charles Bonnycastle intervened to stop them. The faculty committee decided to leave the matter to the courts and take no action against the students.
  • 1829-06-24, Unnamed enslaved woman, Physical violence: Sexual assault

    An unnamed enslaved woman owned by University of Virginia professor Gessner Harrison was the attempted target of sexual assault by University of Virginia student William Garland Carr. Carr and two other students, Robert W. Walton and William K. Morgan, were out at night and very intoxicated. They stopped at Harrison’s home, and Harrison overheard Carr knocking at the cellar door and making indecent propositions to the unnamed woman. Carr asserts that he was just trying to get her to give him some supper. The faculty resolves that Carr should be dismissed from the University, but his application for readmission is accepted on September 7, 1829. Transcript: “Dr. Harrison then informed the Faculty that a disturbing noise was made last night by a number of persons who appeared to be returning from Charlottesville...It was after 12 oclock - there was a knocking at his cellar door & heard indecent propositions made to a female servant...Wm. G. Carr next appeared before the Faculty. Being informed by the Chairman of the charges alledged against him; says he has nothing to say; made no disturbing noise, struck no door - went to Dr. Harrison's house to get something to eat; had another reason for going there which he will not disclose; by knocking at the door he wished to call the attention of a female residing there, who had been in the habit of furnishing him with suppers. Will not say he had been drinking, nor answer any question put to him with regard to drinking, nor will he say whether or not he was intoxicated - Being asked if he had any thing to say in explanation of the charge of intoxication - will not answer the question, not admitting at the same time the truth of the charges; it was between 12 and 1 when ** he knocked at Dr. Harrison's door - admits he made some noise. did sing was not intoxicated when Dr. H. saw him - retired to rest soon after... It appearing from the admission of Wm G. Carr & other evidence, that he had been drinking last night at a tavern in Charlottesville, that he was one of a riotous party, and was himself disorderly; that he was further guilty of indecent conduct in endeavoring to get access to a female servant in a pavilion of one of the professors - Resolved, therefore, that the said Wm. G. Carr be dismissed from the University”
  • Mrs. Woodson

    Mrs. Woodson was a boarder at Lucy Terrell's boarding house in May of 1856. At that time she was the enslaver of a 10-11 year old girl who was assaulted during their stay. Mrs. Woodson appears in the May 2, 1856 Minutes of the Faculty of the University of Virginia.
  • Socrates Maupin

    Socrates Maupin was born in Albemarle County, Virginia on 12 November 1808. He graduated from Washington College in 1828 and received his medical diploma from the University of Virginia two years later. After spending an additional three years at Virginia, Maupin earned an M.A. degree. He accepted the chair of ancient languages at Hampden-Sydney College where he spent just two years before relocating to Richmond where he established his own classical and mathematical school. At the request of Dr. Augustus L. Warner, Maupin joined the original faculty of the Medical Department of Hampden-Sydney College as professor of chemistry and pharmacy medica. He became Dean of the medical department when Warner died in 1847. In 1853, Maupin accepted the professorship of chemistry and materia medica at the University of Virginia. The following year he became dean of the faculty and served until 1870. Maupin married Sallie Hays Traverse Washington and was the father of six children. In October of 1871 Maupin sustained a fatal head injury from a fall he sustained from a runway carriage. He died on 19 October and was buried in the University of Virginia cemetery. Description taken from the biographical note in the finding aid for the Socrates Maupin Collection at Virginia Commonwealth University. https://archives.library.vcu.edu/repositories/3/resources/53
  • Lucy Terrell

    Lucy Terrell was a hotel keeper at the University of Virginia from 1837-1860. She appears in the Faculty Meeting Minutes of the University of Virginia, the Journals of the Chairman of the Faculty, the University catalogs, and the John Staige Davis papers.
  • Noble Beveridge Noland

    Noble Beveridge Noland was a student at the University of Virginia from 1855-1857. He appears in in the Faculty Meeting Minutes of the University of Virginia, Journals of the Chairman of the Faculty, and University catalogs during that time period.
  • Jesse Lewis Heiskell

    Jesse Lewis Heiskell appears in the March 2, 1839 University of Virginia Faculty Meeting Minutes, and the Journals of the Chairman of the Faculty.
  • Hezekiah Perry

    Hezekiah Perry appears in the March 2, 1839 University of Virginia Faculty Meeting Minutes, and the Journals of the Chairman of the Faculty.
  • Garrison

    Garrison appears in the March 2, 1839 University of Virginia Faculty Meeting Minutes, and the Journals of the Chairman of the Faculty.
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